Philfiki

21 year old Asian Studies student, aspiring linguist, martial artist, and circus performer.

Anonymous asked: As a lesbian, I do not care at all about bisexual girls feeling left out or judged in the LGBTQ community. I know that's horrible, especially since my girlfriend is bi, but I find it very revolting when I think about making love with someone that loves taking dick. I fell for my girlfriend without knowing she likes guys and girls. I don't purposefully date bisexual girls and I don't think it's wrong to say that.

gemdol:

last-snowfall:

star-anise:

annekewrites:

socialworkgradstudents:

1-800-hair-nest:

amazingatheist:

sc0uttt:

fatpinkmyrishswamp:

sc0uttt:

the-unfeminine-aesthetic:

.

I really hope your girlfriend realizes she’s dating a pathetic waste of a human being and finds someone infinitely better. 

A lot of lesbians are turned off by the idea of their gf having sex with men. Why is that such a bad thing? Why is it so wrong to only like women who like other women? I think the anon who asked this should be honest with her gf and break up with her though if it’s that much of a turn off. 

At first I wasn’t going to reply to comments like these but now that I’ve had a couple of beers the idea of repeatedly hitting my head against a brick wall seems more enjoyable so here we go.

I have a problem with lesbians who claim that they have a “preference” towards dating other lesbians over bisexuals. I understand having a preference, I personally have a preference for girls who are my height or taller than me.  However, does this preference make me view my own voice, safety, and representation in my community as superior and of more importance than those I do not have a preference for? Nope. That’s why this anon (and unfortunately other like minded individuals)  don’t have a “preference” they are biphobic and overall prejudicial assholes.

If you’re not comfortable dating bisexual people because you feel they will ultimately leave you for the opposite sex or (insert other stereotypical view of bisexuals) you don’t have a preference, you are biphobic, and have some huge insecurities that you should probably deal with before you enter a relationship.

If you’re a lesbian and do not feel comfortable dating a woman who is also attracted to individuals with dicks because you find it “icky” or “gross”, it must blow your mind when you find out your partner likes watermelon and you don’t. How do you even move forward from there? Is the relationship just doomed? And yes it is the same thing. Those individuals are judging someone based on something they cannot control.

Prejudice and phobia inside the queer community is something I will never understand and is absolutely infuriating. 

Prejudice and phobia in any community makes no sense.

This is really upsetting and I’ll tell you why.

A lot of this is about respect. If you have a partner whose sexuality you can’t respect or, at bare minimum, even accept, you should not be with that person. I understand that some people don’t like penetration or aren’t attracted to people with penises, but if you truly respected your partner, you would be comfortable with them regardless of their sexual history and orientation. Their preferences have nothing to do with you (outside of the fact that you’re both attracted to women), and what matters is that they care about and are with you now.

Anonymous, you need to sit down and do some soul searching. You need to consider what about simply knowing this about your partner feels so wrong to you, and why. Think about it practically: Are you concerned your partner will leave you for someone else? Does knowing this make you feel your partner is somehow dirty or tainted? Do you think it means your partner will never fully commit to you? Why is your partner’s orientation and sexual history so important and upsetting to you? Consider the assumptions you’re making about bisexuality and those who are bisexual.

You also need to have a talk with your partner. You need to tell them how you feel and why you think you feel that way. Then you and your partner need to decide if you can continue your relationship. You should not be with someone you can’t accept, and your partner should not have to be with someone who really feels that way (nor should they be kept in the dark about this!).

This is biphobia at its most basic. I understand you have your own preferences, but you have no right to negatively judge someone for theirs, especially someone you’ve entered a relationship with.

This thought process also raises a bunch of other questions: What about trans or non-binary people? People with penises who are not straight or cisgendered? Would you feel the same if your partner had been with a transgender woman who had a penis? (Because that’d also be transphobic.) And what about sex play using toys or fingers? Obviously lots of people don’t enjoy penetration, but would it be better or different if your partner had only been penetrated by toys? Why?

Anonymous, you need to come clean to your partner and seriously rethink your feelings towards bisexuality.

Yo if a dude was all, I won’t fuck that girl cause she once fucked somebody I think is gross, we’d call that shit misogyny.

The idea that a penis can somehow dramatically corrupt or alter the body of a woman is straight up goddamn patriarchy-lovin misogyny, if you add in “but it’s about bisexuality” then fine you’re also biphobic, way to multitask your policing of female sexuality, very talented work

^^^^^ THIS.  THANK YOU.

Lesbian biphobia has so many shades of virginity fetishization and slut-shaming.  “Now that you, fair woman, have been RAVISHED by a MAN, you are icky and impure and gross.”  And it also somehow makes male/female sex seem more important than female/female sex?  “If she’s only been with women, she’ll be content to stay with women; but if she’s been with a man, she’ll always be tempted to dump her girlfriend and stray back to men.”

It manages to be misandric (men are so evil they taint everything they touch), patriarchal (men are so powerful they permanently alter everything they touch) AND misogynistic (women are polluted by the sex they have) ALL AT ONCE.

That takes talent. The bad kind.

I’m just gonna reiterate the fact that Anon isn’t just disgusting for all of the above reasons but also clearly genders penises, so they’re transmisogynistic as well and it’s really important that doesn’t get lost in the labyrinthine fortress of bigotry they’ve erected around themself, wow.

The video features a group of unnamed black kids, purportedly from Ferguson, reciting parts of a script that’s clearly been written by adults. A script that will make you think race is solely a black and white issue, by the way. Even if the children are from Ferguson, it’s unclear if or how they’ve been compensated. Either way, the idea that these kids are from Ferguson is paraded for consumption.

Towards the end, a white adult and a black adult make nice and encourage viewers to buy a FCKH8.com T-shirt. Five dollars from each shirt will supposedly go to unidentified “charities working in communities to fight racism.” Which charities? Who knows! What communities? Can’t tell you.

The video concludes with a dedication, “For Mike,” and a quiet scene from the Ferguson street on which Michael Brown was killed by officer Darren Wilson more than a month ago.

The company behind the video, FCKH8.com, has made a name for itself selling what it calls “LGBT Equality Gear” (which sort of covers some LGB themes, but sort of leaves the T part out). It’s now trying to do the same with its “Anti-Racism Gear.” According to its website, FCKH8.com “recently became owned and managed by Synergy Media,” a corporate branding firm whose clients include Magnum bodybuilding vitamin supplements and pretty offensive “Buckeye Boob T’s” (the latter despite the fact that FCKH8.com says it’s anti-sexist).

There’s an entire economy around black death—and this ad campaign illustrates it all too well. Ironically, this economy’s profit margins depend on upholding the very racism this video claims to want to eliminate.

So there you have it, folks. Everything, it seems, can distilled, packaged, bought and sold—including racism.

This is the T-Shirt Company Making Money Off of Ferguson by Aura Bogado

TLDR: do not buy the shirts being sold by fckh8! 

(via navigatethestream)

cisyphus:

Slurs are not oppressive because they are offensive, they are oppressive  because slurs by nature of being slurs draw upon certain power dynamics  to remind their target of his/her/their vulnerability in a certain relation to power and as an extension of that, to threaten violence and exploitation of that vulnerability.

bootynbraids:

whogivesmestrength:

chantelbrenna:

squidsqueen:

What makes me so happy about this is that she isn’t telling you you must love your body or that you are obligated to. She saying you have permission to. And that’s important, because there are a lot of reasons why people have trouble with self-love.  But the idea that you aren’t supposed to love your body, that you aren’t allowed to for whatever reason, needs to be crushed. If you can’t love you body right now, if your body causes you pain or disphoria or distress, you aren’t required to love it. But you are ALLOWED to. You are entitled to the chance to make peace with your body, if you ever reach a point where you are ready to. No one else should be trying to stop you.

Sometimes I see or read things, and I didn’t realize that I needed them until they are two GIFs of Nicki Minaj and some amazing commentary that come across my dash and I instantly burst in to tears and feel a weight lifted off my chest.

This is so important

Yoooo it is so important to recognize Nicki’s intelligence; especially with the above commentary. Nicki KNOWS what she is saying. The advice she is giving isn’t narrow, it is incredible broad so it makes everyone feel included. In so little, she said so much. This is the sign of a great orator. (Plus, anyone who disses her musicianship can go suck some nuts because she won the Young Arts Scholarship which is presented to youth who are at the top of their art genre) 

“These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.”

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)